Luke Geraty on Striking the Balance Between Comfort & False Conversion

Luke Geraty says in an article called Striking the Balance Between Comfort & False Conversion over at the Think Theology blog… Check it out.

“But I’m not a fan of the title “eternal security” because I don’t believe it rightly emphasizes the importance of both God’s sovereign work in carrying us to completion along with the fact that people are responsible to respond to God’s grace. And I absolutely deplore the term “once saved, always saved” because it has been used to undermine the biblical concept of sanctification and has polluted the water around the issue of salvation. Frankly, there have been innumerable people who have walked around believing that they can live however the want while doing whatever they want because they “made a decision” at some point and were “saved.” This is where I find a lot to commend with Scot McKnight’s recent book, The King Jesus GospelYes, you can be a “Calvinist” and still love much of McKnight’s work and even say, “Amen” to his Jesus-centered theological constructs… especially when the kingdom of God is so prevalent in his writings!”

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3 comments on “Luke Geraty on Striking the Balance Between Comfort & False Conversion

  1. I’ve never really bought into the idea of “once saved, always saved” as it seems to promote the whole idea of “fire insurance”. Yeah, I said the sinners prayer so now I can be a heathen and still know that I am “saved”. I tend to look at this more like those who are “saved” have a much greater responsibility. I’m not saying they will live a life free of sin, but rather, a life in acceptance of Christ, loving God, loving your neighbor, and promoting humanity.

    The idea of being “saved” also seems to me to be one that we, as human beings, need to grasp in order to belong to the club. Truly, only Jesus knows who is in His kingdom, so I think that we need only to focus on Him and His glory and not a title in a club. Just my thoughts…

  2. disableme says:

    “The idea of being “saved” also seems to me to be one that we, as human beings, need to grasp in order to belong to the club.”

    I agree with you. Words like “conversion” and “saved” are definitely carrying a negative connotation today. Why do you think that is?

  3. I think, and I am speaking generally, that some Christians suffer from a superiority complex. All religions have this issue, but living in a western civilization, we see Christianity in the forefront all of the time. People like Pat Robertson and other Christian leaders that we see (often from the southern U.S.) spewing hatred under the banner of Christ is appalling. They, unfortunately, are on the front pages of Christianity today. Somehow, they manage to have a following and that is the face of Christianity that people see. So when you say “saved” or “converted”, I can imagine people rolling their eyes and asking…”How do they KNOW that?” Because really, is the person who is “saved” better than the humanitarian who maybe doesn’t know Christ but lives his or her life with more Christ-like values?

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